Why Should Dyke Marsh Be Restored?

 

Restoration Update

  See "When Will Dyke Marsh Be Restored?" below.
 

Dyke Marsh erosionThe Dyke Marsh shoreline is eroding 1.5 to two acres a year. Photo by Glenda Booth.Dyke Marsh Is Disappearing

Dyke Marsh will be gone by 2035, 20 years from now, without action, predicts the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The marsh is losing 1.5 to two acres a year and the rate of erosion is accelerating.

 

"Dyke Marsh is "the nearest thing to primeval wilderness in the immediate vicinity of the city.” -- Louis Halle, 1947

In a 2013 update to their 2010 landmark study, USGS reported, "We ultimately conclude that Dyke Marsh presently is in its late stages of failure as a freshwater tidal marsh system. Bathymetry data confirm that tidal creeks are stripping sediment from the marsh, rather than aggrading it onto the marsh. Erosion is fragmenting the marsh and dismantling tidal creek networks by stream piracy. In the absence of human efforts to restore the equilibrium between marsh and tide, and equilibrium to the other natural forces acting on this wetland, Dyke Marsh likely will continue to accelerate its degradation, erosion, and fragmentation until it is gone. This likely will occur prior to 2035 AD."

Erosion over timeDyke Marsh erosion and loss from 1937 to 2006. Click photo to enlarge.The Problem

In 1940, Dyke Marsh was around 180 acres in size. By 2010, it was around 53 acres, said USGS. The USGS scientists wrote, “Analysis of field evidence, aerial photography, and published maps has revealed an accelerating rate of erosion and marsh loss at Dyke Marsh, which now appears to put at risk the short term survivability of this marsh.”

The USGS 2010 study also had these findings:

• Dredging of sand and gravel from 1940 to 1972 was a strong destabilizing force, transforming it from a net depositional state to a net erosional state. Dredging removed around 101 acres or 54 percent of the 1937 marsh.

USGS Study2010 USGS Study• Erosion is both continuous and episodic. The changes caused by dredging have made the marsh subject to significant erosion by storm waves, especially from winds traveling upriver. Damaging storms occur approximately every three years.

• Mining or removing the promontory on the southern end of Dyke Marsh removed the geologic wave protection of the south marsh that existed back to at least 1864 and altered the size and function of the tidal creek network.

• “This freshwater tidal marsh has shifted from a semi-stable net depositional environment (1864–1937) into a strongly erosional one . . . The marsh has been deconstructed over the past 70 years by a combination of manmade and natural causes. The marsh initially experienced a strong destabilizing period between 1940 and 1972 by direct dredge mining of the marsh surface. By 1976 the marsh had entered a net destructive phase, where it remains at present.”

• The minimal protection needed to protect and enhance natural deposition includes a wave break in the location of the former promontory.

The U.S. Geological Survey study is titled Analysis of the Deconstruction of Dyke Marsh, George Washington Memorial Parkway, Virginia: Progression, Geologic and Manmade Causes, and Effective Restoration Scenarios and was written by Ronald J. Litwin, Joseph P. Smoot, Milan J. Pavich, Helaine W. Markewich, Erik Oberg, Ben Helwig, Brent Steury, Vincent L. Santucci, Nancy J. Durika, Nancy B. Rybicki, Katharina M. Engelhardt, Geoffrey Sanders, Stacey Verardo, Andrew J. Elmore and Joseph Gilmer. It is on the USGS website here.

The NPS Restoration Plan

Restoration PlanNPS Natural Resources Manager Brent Steury discusses the plan with FODM board member Trudi Hahn.  Photo by Glenda Booth.NPS Restoration PlanThe NPS Dyke Marsh Restoration PlanThe National Park Service (NPS) published the final Dyke Marsh Restoration and Long-term Management Plan on October 9, 2014 in the form of an environmental impact statement (EIS). Among other objectives, the plan would restore wetlands and ecosystem functions and processes and protect the remaining wetland. Restoration would also increase the resilience of the marsh, provide a buffer to storms and control flooding, states the EIS. NPS maintains that their restoration plan would bring beneficial impacts to the marsh's hydrology, sediment transport, vegetation and wetlands and stabilize erosion.
Alternative CAlternative C
Click image to enlarge
NPS’s plan or preferred alternative is “alternative C,”  the “fullest possible extent of wetland restoration,” an approach which would restore up to 180 acres of wetland habitats in stages. The Friends of Dyke Marsh support alternative C. NPS would restore the marsh in a phased approach “up to the historic boundary of the marsh and other adjacent areas within NPS jurisdictional boundaries, except for the area immediately adjacent to the marina.”
In phase one, NPS would build a breakwater in the southern part of the marsh to replicate the promontory removed by dredgers and identified by USGS as critical to protecting and restoring wetland habitat. "Phased restoration would continue until a sustainable marsh is achieved . . . .," says the plan.

Other steps:
• fill the deep channels created by dredging;
• restore emergent marsh within the area of the historic promontory;
• build containment cells within the historic boundary. "The location of these cells would be prioritized based on the most benefits of the specific locations could provide to the existing marsh. . . ."
• restore marsh along the edge of existing marsh to wherever the water is less than four feet deep; and
• install breaks in the Haul Road to "reintroduce tidal flows west of the Haul Road" and to restore the swamp forest.

FODM Supports Restoration

Restoration FlyerFODM Restoration Flyer
Click image to enlarge.
The Friends of Dyke Marsh have advocated for restoration of Dyke Marsh since the organization's founding in 1976. FODM believes that a restored marsh can restore coastal resiliency, buffer the area against some storm activity, restore more habitat for birds, fish and other wildlife; restore more native wetland plants and other biota; create a healthier overall ecosystem, and if restored, provide more opportunities for research, nature study and educational, recreational and other nature-oriented activities. A restored Dyke Marsh can be a more robust outdoor classroom for hundreds of students of all ages and a natural laboratory for scientists and others.

Restoration Funds Are Available

Thanks to broad support, funding is available, from two sources:

1. MWAA Mitigation Funds

On March 27, 2013, the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority (MWAA) made available to the National Park Service (NPS) $2.5 million for construction of a "promontory structure breakwater." The breakwater would be designed to replicate the historic promontory in the southern end of the marsh that protected Dyke Marsh, but was removed by Smoot Sand and Gravel. The USGS study maintains that a replacement promontory would provide a buffer against storms and flooding, encourage accretion and deposition of sediment and restore ecosystem services that benefit the Potomac River, the Chesapeake Bay and the community. The airport funds represent compensatory mitigation for impacts of a runway extension, an airport landing safety area, required to meet Federal Aviation Administration safety standards.

NPS and MWAA received 80 public comments, almost all of which were supportive. Among those who sent supportive comments were Congressmen Jim Moran and Gerry Connolly; Sharon Bulova, Chair, Fairfax County Board of Supervisors; William Euille, Mayor of Alexandria; the Northern Virginia Conservation Trust; the National Parks and Conservation Association; the Nature Conservancy (Virginia); the Potomac Conservancy; the Audubon Society of Northern Virginia; the Audubon Naturalist Society; the Mount Vernon Council of Citizen Associations and the Virginia Conservation Network.

2. Department of Interior, $25 Million in Resiliency Funds

Secretay of Interior JewellSecretary Jewell makes the announcement flanked by Senator Tim Kaine, D-VA (left), Congressman Jim Moran, D-VA and FODM president Glenda Booth. Photo by T.D. Hobart.U.S. Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell on October 24, 2013 came to the Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve and announced the award of a $24.9 million grant to restore Dyke Marsh, part of President Barack Obama’s Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Strategy and Climate Action Plan to build resilience by restoring natural features along shorelines and to protect communities from storms. Virginia U.S. Senator Tim Kaine, a staffer for U.S. Senator Mark Warner, Eighth Congressional District Congressman Jim Moran and Alexandria Councilwoman Allison Silberberg attended.Secretary Jewell said, “What we witnessed during Hurricane Sandy was that our public lands and other natural areas are often the best defense against Mother Nature. By stabilizing marshes and beaches, restoring wetlands, and improving the resiliency of coastal areas, we not only create opportunities for people to connect with nature and support jobs through increased outdoor recreation, but we can also provide an effective buffer that protects local communities from powerful storm surges and devastating floods when a storm like Sandy hits.”The announcement is on the Department of the Interior website and a video is here.

 

 Why is Dyke Marsh Significant? 
FODM has published a flyer outlining the significance of Dyke Marsh and why we should care about the health of this valuable resource. Click image at right. DM Flyer 

Summary

• Without restoration, Dyke Marsh will be gone in 20 years.

• NPS has prepared a restoration plan.

• Funds are available to complete most of the restoration.

• The National Park Service should implement the restoration plan.

Why Should Dyke Marsh Be Restored?

  "In 1959, this body [the U.S. House of Representatives] passed legislation that designated Fairfax County's Dyke Marsh as a protected ecosystem for the purpose of promoting fish and wildlife development and preserving their natural habitat. Now, at the time, Dyke Marsh was being dredged for commercial purposes. They were going deeper and deeper to get gravel. They were ruining the ecosystem. For those who live in the Washington metropolitan area or may be visiting the Washington metropolitan area, if you go down the George Washington Parkway toward Mount Vernon, right after the city of Alexandria, you will see Dyke Marsh. . . Dyke Marsh is about 500 acres. It's preserved. It's a beautiful area. You can see bald eagles; you can see great blue herons. You can see snapping turtles; a whole lot of bullfrogs. There aren't a lot of places left in the Washington area where you can see this unless you go to the zoo." -- Former Congressman Jim Moran (D-VA), October 6, 2009

Rare: Dyke Marsh is a rare freshwater, tidal wetland along the Virginia shoreline of the Potomac River in the Washington, D. C., area, one of the most highly-valued habitats in the region. It is one of the most significant temperate, climax, riverine, narrow-leafed, cattail marshes in the U. S. National Park system nationwide. The marsh started forming between 5,000 and 7,000 years ago with the youngest part located on the northern extension. It is unusual because much of it has survived in a large metropolitan, heavily developed area.

Habitat Loss Means Species and Opportunities Lost: Over the years, there has been a decline in many species and some have become extinct in Dyke Marsh. Dyke Marsh supports the only known nesting population of marsh wrens (Cistothorus palustris) in the upper Potomac tidal zone, a species once found in many of the marshes that lined the Potomac River. In 1950, 87 singing males were counted. In 2012, two nests were found. In 2015, one marsh wren has been seen. The least bittern, which also nests in Dyke Marsh, is on the Virginia’s threatened list. A restored Dyke Marsh can provide more habitat for more birds, fish and other wildlife, more plants, more biodiversity and more opportunities for recreation, education and scientific study.

Cleaner Water: The restoration of Dyke Marsh can help improve water quality in the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay because wetlands filter out pollutants and sediment loads from stormwater runoff. The Potomac provides drinking water to over five million people in the Washington area. Minimizing contaminants that might be missed during water treatment procedures can improve human health.

Restoration Can Buffer Some Flooding, Surges: Wetlands can stem flooding. A one-acre wetland can store about three acre-feet of water or one million gallons, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (An acre-foot is one acre of land, about three-fourths the size of a football field covered with one foot of water.) Preserving and rebuilding natural defenses against storms is one of the most cost-effective and sustainable ways to protect communities and natural resources (Defenders of Wildlife). Virginia has lost almost half of its wetlands.

“Chincoteague, Dyke Marsh, and the Great Dismal Swamp are natural treasures of Virginia. In recent years, disasters like Sandy and crises like sequestration and the government shutdown have significantly impacted our ability to maintain the Commonwealth’s natural resources. I welcome this much-needed federal investment and will continue working to preserve the Commonwealth's beautiful waters and lands for future generations to enjoy.” -- U.S. Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA), October 25, 2013  

Rich in Diversity: Dyke Marsh has 300 known species of plants, 6,000 arthropods, 38 fish, 16 reptiles, 14 amphibians, over 230 birds. Since at least the late 1800s, it has been the only site in the upper Potomac River with a breeding population of marsh wrens, but in 2015, whether these birds bred in Dyke Marsh is unclear. The marsh has a state-threatened breeding population of least bitterns. A restored marsh can support and expand that biodiversity.

Congress Stressed Preservation: The U. S. Congress designated Dyke Marsh in 1959 by law as part of the National Park system “so that fish and wildlife development and their preservation as wetland wildlife habitat shall be paramount.” Congress reaffirmed its support and the marsh’s significance by approving House Resolution 701 in 2009 and Senate Resolution 297 in 2010. In 1974, Congress authorized the Corps of Engineers to assist NPS in restoring the “historic and ecological values of Dyke Marsh.”

Human Caused: Extensive dredging of almost half the marsh from 1940 to 1972 destabilized the marsh. People inflicted the damage; people should fix it.

*** Restoration Progress Update ***
May 2017

When Will Dyke Marsh Be Restored?

Everyone is asking when Dyke Marsh restoration will begin and be completed?

On September 28-29, 2015, National Park Service (NPS) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) officials met to begin the design of the restoration of Dyke Marsh under a NPS-COE interagency agreement.  Officials estimate the design phase will take at least 12 months. Once the design is completed, NPS will have to get several permits before starting construction of the first phase, the breakwater on the southern end of the marsh to replicate the promontory removed by the dredgers.   Once NPS obtains necessary permits, construction will take around two years. 

In December 2015, the Corps of Engineers created a website for the project:  http://www.nab.usace.army.mil/Missions/CivilWorks/dykemarshrestoration.aspx.  COE  has posted some history, facts, a map, photographs, tentative schedule and the conceptual restoration plan.COE boat

COE officials have said that they hope to award a contract to build the promontory in 2017 and that they might start building a containment cell in 2017 as well.  COE officials also expect substantial construction to be completed in 2019, depending on funds.

In early 2016, Corps staff conducted a bathymetric survey in Dyke Marsh (photo, right by Ed Eder).

bargeIn May, using a barge (photo left by Ned Stone), the Corps staff conducted dilatometer tests in Dyke Marsh to measure different layers of soil and soil strength for building the foundation of the breakwater in the south marsh. Building a breakwater is expected to be phase one of the marsh restoration project. These tests will inform the final design of the restoration.

In July 2016, NPS signed an agreement on restoration design with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and in September, NPS had a “Rapid Review Team” presentation, precursor to the “Design Advisory Board,” required for projects costing over $1 million.

On March 28-30, 2017, NPS and the Baltimore District/Corps of Engineers hosted a two-day value analysis to clarify development concepts and to further refine the project plans, including the alignment of the proposed breakwater and location of off-shore sills.

On March 7, 2017, the NPS Design Advisory Board (DAB) approved the restoration project.  The DAB reviews, comments on and if found sufficient, recommends construction projects costing over $500,000.

The Baltimore Corps of Engineers is now preparing the design and engineering plans for restoration.

On May 21, 2017, the George Washington Memorial Parkway office of the National Park Service submitted a joint permit application to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk District.

FODM will try to provide updates as we receive them.

Dyke Marsh Restoration, A Chronology

1930s - Smoot Sand and Gravel acquired 650 acres of Dyke Marsh from Bucknell University.

1940 to 1972 - Smoot Sand and Gravel dredged least 270 acres of sand and gravel and the swamp forest wetlands of the promontory on the south end of Dyke Marsh and built the Haul Road.

1959 - Congress passed and the President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed into law P.L. 86-41 on June 11, a bill adding the Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve to the National Park system "so that fish and wildlife development and their preservation as wetland wildlife habitat shall be paramount." Congressman John Dingell (D-Michigan), one of the authors of the legislation, stated, "We expect that the Secretary will provide for the deposition of silt and waste from the dredging operations in such a way as to encourage the restoration of the marsh at the earliest possible moment."

“Dyke Marsh is one of the most significant temperate, tidal, freshwater, riverine marshes in the National Park system. It is a remnant of the tidal wetlands that once lined the Potomac River." -- Congressman Gerry Connolly (D-VA), October 6, 2009  

1974 - Congress passed and the President signed P.L. 93-251 which authorized the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assist NPS in planning, designing and implementing the restoration of the “historic and ecological values of Dyke Marsh.”

1975 - Smoot Sand and Gravel relinquished their mining rights.

1977 - The National Park Service prepared an environmental assessment proposing management options for Dyke Marsh, including "attempt re-establishment of portions of the dredged marsh."

2004 - The University of Maryland, Center for Environmental Science, Appalachian Laboratory held a workshop titled, "Should We Restore Dyke Marsh"?

2007 - Congress passed the Water Resources Development Act which directed NPS to restore Dyke Marsh.

2009 - The U.S. House of Representatives approved H. Res. 701, introduced by Congressman Jim Moran (D-VA), recognizing Dyke Marsh as a unique and precious ecosystem that should be conserved, protected and restored.

  "Dyke Marsh is a magnificent little oasis” – Former U.S. Senator John Warner (R-VA), 2006

2010 -The U.S. Senate approved S. Res. 297, introduced by Senator Jim Webb (D-VA), recognizing Dyke Marsh as a unique and precious ecosystem that should be conserved, protected and restored.

2010 - The U.S. Geological Survey study found that Dyke Marsh will disappear in 20 to 30 years without action. Analysis of the Deconstruction of Dyke Marsh, George Washington Memorial Parkway, Virginia: Progression, Geologic and Manmade Causes, and Effective Restoration Scenarios. By Ronald J. Litwin, Joseph P. Smoot, Milan J. Pavich, Helaine W. Markewich, Erik Oberg, Ben Helwig, Brent Steury, Vincent L. Santucci, Nancy J. Durika, Nancy B. Rybicki, Katharina M. Engelhardt, Geoffrey Sanders, Stacey Verardo, Andrew J. Elmore, and Joseph Gilmer

2013

March 27 - The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority announced a statement of findings, making $2.5 million available to NPS for construction of the first phase of restoration a promontory in the southern part of the marsh.

October 3 - The U.S. Geological Survey published a follow-up report, concluding that ". . . Dyke Marsh presently is in its late stages of failure as a freshwater tidal marsh system . . . In the absence of human efforts to restore the equilibrium between marsh and tide, and equilibrium to the other natural forces acting on this wetland, Dyke Marsh likely will continue to accelerate its degradation, erosion, and fragmentation until it is gone. This likely will occur prior to 2035 AD." Rates and Probable Causes of Freshwater Tidal Marsh Failure, Potomac River Estuary, Northern Virginia, USA. By Ronald J. Litwin, Joseph P. Smoot, Milan J. Pavich, Erik Oberg, Brent Steury, Ben Helwig, Helaine W. Markewich, Vincent L. Santucci and Geoffrey Sanders. See the report.

October 25 - U.S. Department of Interior Secretary Sally Jewell announced the award of a $24.9 million grant to the George Washington Memorial Parkway to restore Dyke Marsh.

2014

January - NPS issued the draft Restoration and Long-term Management Plan/Draft Environmental Impact Statement and had a public comment period from January 15 to March 18. During the comment period, NPS received around 300 comments, most of which were supportive.

February 26 - NPS held a public meeting and presented the draft final environmental impact statement (EIS) and restoration plan. Around 100 people attended.

October 9 - The National Park Service published the final Dyke Marsh Restoration and Long-term Management Plan in the form of an environmental impact statement.

2015

July -- Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the National Park Service (NPS) signed an interagency agreement on preparing a restoration plan.

Fall -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) started preparing engineering plans for restoration, after a September 28-29 "kickoff" meeting with NPS.  NPS and COE officials predict that the design phase will take 12 months.

October 15 -- The National Park Service issued a press release announcing that the COE is preparing engineering plans and that geotechnical drilling in the marsh will start on October 19.  The drilling will provide sediment samples from the marsh and help determine some features of the foundation for the design of the promontory, phase one of restoration.  The release states, " The restoration efforts are anticipated to begin summer  2017 and expected to take four years." NPS and COE announced that the "project team is looking for potential sources of clean dredged material at no cost for restoration purposes."  For information, contact Rolando Sanidad, project manager, at 410-962-2668 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Once the design work is completed, NPS will have to get several permits.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers signed the programmatic agreement for section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

December -- The Baltimore District Corps of Engineers created a website on Dyke Marsh restoration at http://www.nab.usace.army.mil/Missions/CivilWorks/dykemarshrestoration.aspx .

2016

February - The COE conducted a bathymetric survey in Dyke Marsh.

May - The COE conducted dilatometer tests in Dyke Marsh to measure different layers of soil and the soil strength for building the foundation of the breakwater in the south marsh.

June 29 – Robert Vogel, Regional Director, National Capital Region, National Park Service, signed the record of decision for the Dyke Marsh Wetland Restoration and Long-term Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement.

July – NPS signed an agreement on restoration design with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

September – NPS had a rapid review team presentation, precursor to the design advisory board, required for projects costing over $1 million.

2017

March 28-30 - NPS and the Baltimore District/COE hosted a two-day value analysis to clarify development concepts and refine the projects plans.

March 7 - The NPS Design Advisory Board (DAB) approved the restoration project. 

May 21 – The NPS submitted a joint permit application to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk District.

September 12 -- The Fairfax County Wetlands Board held a public hearing on the NPS application to restore Dyke Marsh and approved the permit.

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